Category Archives: Monday’s Cover

Monday Cover : Dancing in the Dark performed by Downtown Boys

downtown-boys

Downtown Boys : Dancing in the Dark (originally by Bruce Springsteen)

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Monday Cover : There is A Light That Never Goes Out performed by Braid

Braid: There is A Light That Never Goes Out (originally by The Smiths)

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2016 In Review: Monday Cover: The Suburbs performed by Father John Misty

Father John Misty: The Suburbs (originally by Arcade Fire)

Stripped down to just a acoustic guitar, Father John Misty transforms the original from a jangling nostalgia trip with a ragtime swing into a more introspective folk tale.  The bare bones quality of Father John’s take completely changes the tone of the song, slowing in down to give breath to the lyrics and have you really ponder over the intention of the stroll down memory lane.  As a child of the suburbs I can relate to the fact that the same place or song through a new prism can have different meanings and feelings conveyed.  Growing up in a safe idealistic community only to not only rediscover later that it never was as perfect as perceived but also that the place you once called home might never feel that way again.

Monday’s Cover: Breakdown performed by Foo Fighters

Foo Fighters: Breakdown (originally by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers)

With the big announcement last week that Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers are headed out on a massive tour in 2017, it is only fitting we kick off the week with another monster act covering one of their hits.  Over the 40 years together they have strung together a laundry list of hits that have been incredibly influential on countless other musicians.  I can honestly say that in my personal concert going experiences there is no artist that gets covered more than Tom Petty.  Here is a take on one of the more sleek and slinky hits, done up by a band who was so influenced by Tom Petty that they are reuniting from their almost 2 year hiatus to perform at an awards show honoring Tom Petty as MusiCares Person of the Year.

Monday’s Cover: Inside of Love performed by Kevin Devine

Kevin Devine: Inside of Love (originally by Nada Surf)

Let’s kick off Kevin Devine Week the right way with this incredible cover of Nada Surf’s love lamenting Inside of Love.  Last year Kevin set forth on creating what he called the Devinyl Splits Series, where he would split a 7 inch with another inspirational musician, each offering up a single of some sort.  The first released featured Matthew Caws of Nada Surf who provided an incredible cover of Kevin Devine’s Fiscal Cliff, and Kevin’s beautiful take on Inside of Love.  In total there were 6 releases, each exceptional and drastically different, a must check out.

Monday’s Cover: Hurt by Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash: Hurt (Originally by Nine Inch Nails)

This sullen ballad of regret has become the quintessential example of a cover song done right.  Johnny Cash was a man who had many regrets throughout his life, having spent a long time of hard living throughout his illustrious career.  Towards the end of his life he began to come to grips with a lot of the past mistakes and pain he had caused, hence making his cover of Hurt that much more meaningful and impactful.  Having covered the song near the end of his life, it almost serves as a self eulogy for Cash, and since his passing has become one of his most popular songs.  The original work by Trent Reznor and Nine Inch Nails is a more creepy and processed version at time bordering on anger, but Cash was able to strip it down to an acoustic guitar, piano, and his haunting voice in a more pensive and repentant rendition.

 

Monday’s Cover: Sweet Disposition performed by Ellie Goulding

Ellie Goulding: Sweet Disposition (originally by The Temper Trap)

The British pop firecracker Ellie Goulding took an acoustic approach to The Temper Trap tale of impetuous young love, Sweet Disposition.  A song characterized by the mistakes and passions that come with a lack of seasoning in the relationship game are given an extra layer of sweetness with the floating melodies and embellishments that Ellie provides.  The acoustic guitar and sparse piano provide a more emotive characteristic that places you in a pensive singers bedroom whilst reflecting back.  While the original had a more hard driving drum beat and overall rhythm that almost celebrates the young mistakes, Ellie’s version takes a slightly more regretful tone.  Overall the basis of the song is something we can all relate to, having felt you must rush into everything or else the love would disappear when you were young.

Monday’s Cover: Where is My Mind? by Nada Surf

Nada Surf: Where is My Mind?

The classic Pixies bread and butter gets a little make over from fellow indie titans Nada Surf.  This version isn’t as stripped down as the original with some added synthesizers and drum machines, but it still packs a emotive punch.  Mathew Cawes brings his classic airy vocal delivery to this existential dilemma which adds a rich contrast to the heavily produced track.  One of my favorite songs covered by one of my favorite bands, it doesn’t get any better than that to start off another big week here at American Appetite.

2016 In Review: Monday’s Cover : The Suburbs performed by Father John Misty

Father John Misty: The Suburbs (originally by Arcade Fire)

Stripped down to just a acoustic guitar, Father John Misty transforms the original from a jangling nostalgia trip with a ragtime swing into a more introspective folk tale.  The bare bones quality of Father John’s take completely changes the tone of the song, slowing in down to give breath to the lyrics and have you really ponder over the intention of the stroll down memory lane.  As a child of the suburbs I can relate to the fact that the same place or song through a new prism can have different meanings and feelings conveyed.  Growing up in a safe idealistic community only to not only rediscover later that it never was as perfect as perceived but also that the place you once called home might never feel that way again.

Monday’s Cover: Monster Mash performed by The Misfits

The Misfits: The Monster Mash (originally by Bobby Pickett)

Who better to cover a Halloween classic than those ghoulish punk legends The Misfits.  Sped up and shredded out from their album of covers Project 1950, the horror punk heroes add a little punch and grit to the spooky haunted house classic.  Happy trick or treating to all those partying monsters terrorizing the streets tonight.